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Fire Marshal
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MISSION STATEMENT


The Office of the Fire Marshal is committed to providing the best public service 
possible in order to improve public safety and protect the lives and property of every citizen and visitor to the Town of Brighton.

VISION STATEMENT


The development of sound fire prevention practices through professional fire and life safety plan review services, coupled together with our education and inspection program continues to ensure the delivery of an unmatched level of professionalism and guidance to our community
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meet our Staff & Office Hours 

 Chief Fire Marshal Deputy Fire Marshal  Deputy Fire Marshal  Office Hours
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Christopher Roth Jared Guhl 
David Kaltenbach Monday - Friday
    Direct (585) 784-5220
    Fax     (585) 784-5207

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Direct (585) 784-5214 
Fax     (585) 784-5207 
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Direct (585) 784-5359
Fax     (585) 784-5207
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2300 Elmwood Avenue
Rochester, New York 14618


9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

OR BY APPOINTMENT

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES


Holds responsibility for the fire prevention division; enforces the provisions of the Fire Prevention code and the laws and regulations of Town of Brighton pertaining to fire prevention and fire protection.

Has responsibility for the administration and enforcement of the New York State Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Code.

Has responsibility for the inspection of all buildings and premises, with the exception of residential dwelling units, accordance with the provisions of the Town of Brighton Fire Prevention Code.

Reviews plans for new construction and installation of fire protection equipment to assure fire and life safety regulations are met.

Investigates complaints received by the Office of the Fire Marshal; establishes and maintains comprehensive records of all business transacted such as complaints, inspections, investigations, notices served and permits written.

Confers with, answers questions for and provides direction to property owners, contractors, engineers, architects and others regarding fire protection requirements.

Assists with investigation of all fires involving injury or substantial loss of property.

The Chief Fire Marshal also serves as the Emergency Disaster Coordinator, Employee Safety & Loss Prevention Coordinator and Secretary to the Public Safety Committee.

   Resolutions
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CHANGE YOUR CLOCKS  - CHANGE YOUR BATTERIES 

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Change your smoke alarm batteries while you "spring forward"

March 8, 2015


Change your clocks.jpgTo kick off Daylight Savings Time, clocks “spring forward” at 2 am Sunday morning . Before everyone goes to bed tomorrow, they'll change all of the clocks throughout their homes to reflect the time change.

The Office of the Fire Marshal wants to remind everyone that this might also be a good time to change the batteries in all of your home's smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. 

To stay safe, replacing batteries in all smoke alarms should be done at least once a year, but changing them while changing all of your clocks serves as a great reminder. In addition, smoke alarms should be tested once a month and if an alarm “chirps”, warning the battery is low, replace the battery right away.

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NEW COMMErcial building CARbon monoxide law  - june 27,  2015 


State CO Detector.jpgEffective June 27, 2015

AN ACT to amend the executive law, in relation to requiring the New York state uniform fire prevention and building code to address standards for the installation and maintenance of carbon monoxide detectors in restaurants and other commercial buildings

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND ASSEMBLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as "Steven Nelson's law".

Section 378 of the executive law is amended by adding a new subdivision 5-d to read as follows:


5-D. STANDARDS FOR INSTALLATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTING DEVICES REQUIRING THAT THE OWNER OF EVERY BUILDING THAT CONTAINS ONE OR MORE RESTAURANTS AND THE OWNER OF EVERY COMMERCIAL BUILDING IN THE STATE SHALL HAVE INSTALLED IN SUCH BUILDING AND SHALL MAINTAIN OPERABLE CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTING DEVICE OR DEVICES OF SUCH MANUFACTURE, DESIGN AND INSTALLATION STANDARDS AS ARE ESTABLISHED BY THE COUNCIL. CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTING DEVICES SHALL ONLY BE REQUIRED IF THE RESTAURANT OR COMMERCIAL BUILDING HAS APPLIANCES, DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THAT MAY EMIT CARBON MONOXIDE OR HAS AN ATTACHED GARAGE.

S 3. This act shall take effect on the one hundred eightieth day after it shall have become a law. 

adopt a hydrant 


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HELP THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

By ad
opting the hydrant closest to your home or business and keeping it clear of snow and debris you can help to make our community safer.

In the event of a fire it is imperative that the Fire Department gain access to a water supply via a fire hydrant as quickly as possible so that fire can be extinguished and prevent loss of property and/or life. 

We ask that you shovel the area around your adopted fire hydrant after each snowfall.

Clear a path approximately three feet around the hydrant as well a clear path from the street or roadway up to the fire hydrant so that the hydrant is visible and accessible.

During the summer months it is also important to make sure that the same three foot path around your adopted hydrant is free of weeds, shrubbery, flowerbeds, etc.


Combining safe practices like installing smoke detectors, maintaining defensible space and keeping your closest hydrant clear can prevent unnecessary property damage.


winter fire Safety tips

 
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The United States experiences more fires during the winter months than any other time. Taking simple precautions can prevent most fires.

Follow the safety tips below to help ensure your family’s safety. Remember; fire safety starts with you.

Portable Heaters 

  • Give heaters space. Put at least 36 inches of empty space between the heater and everything else, like furniture, curtains, papers and people.
  • Vacuum and clean the dust and lint from all heaters. A buildup of dust and lint can cause a fire.
  • Check the cord on portable electric heaters. If the cord gets hot, frayed or cracked have the heater serviced.
  • Never use extension cords with portable electric heaters. It is a common cause of fires.
  • Turn off portable heaters when family members leave the house or are sleeping.
  • An adult should always be present when a space heater is used around children.
  • Make sure your portable electric heater is UL approved and has a tip-over shut off function.

Woodstove and Fireplace Safety

  • Have a certified chimney sweep clean and inspect your chimney and fireplace for creosote build-up, cracks, crumbling bricks and obstructions.
  • Place fireplace or wood stove ashes outdoors in a covered metal container at least three feet away from anything that burns.
  • A flue fire can ruin your chimney or stovepipe. To prevent flue fires, burn dry, well-seasoned wood. Burn small, hot fires. Do not burn trash.
  • Always use a fireplace screen made of sturdy metal or heat-tempered glass to prevent sparks from escaping.

Alternative Heat Sources

  • Kerosene heaters are not approved for use in homes in California. Kerosene heaters can emit poisonous fumes.
  • Barbecues, charcoal grills and camp stoves are for outdoor use only. These items can produce carbon monoxide. Odorless and colorless, a build-up of carbon monoxide can be deadly.

Generators

  • If you have a portable generator, make sure you place it in a well-ventilated area. Read the manufacturer’s instructions before using it.
  • Be sure generator fuel is properly and safely stored according to fire regulations. Never store fuel or flammable liquids in a basement or near an open flame. Always refuel the generator outdoors and away from any ignition sources.
  • If you choose to have a generator permanently connected to your home’s electrical system, make sure a licensed electrician installs it and be sure to notify your electric company. Improperly installed generators can cause multiple types of hazards not only for you but for power company workers as well.

Flammable Liquids

  • Use gasoline only as a motor fuel, never as a cleaner.
  • Always use gasoline in a well-vented area, outside is best.
  • Never use gasoline to start fires.
  • Store gasoline in an approved well-labeled container. Make sure the container is tightly sealed. Store gasoline outside the house, in a shed or detached garage. Store only small amounts.
  • Make sure all flammable liquids are stored away from ignition sources such as pilot lights, water heaters, electrical appliances and open flames.

Natural Gas – Propane Fuel

  • Like many other efficient fuels, natural gas is highly flammable. That means it can be dangerous if not handled properly.
  • If using a propane-fueled heater, make sure it is designed for indoor use. Read all of the manufacturer’s instructions and make sure it is properly vented.
  • Do not use propane barbecues (or any other type of barbecue) indoors.
  • If you have propane-fueled appliances, make sure they are properly vented and follow all manufacturers’ instructions.
  • If you smell gas, do not operate any switches, appliances or thermostats. A spark from one of these could ignite the gas. Get everyone outside and away from the building. Shut off the gas supply. Call 9-1-1.

Emergency escape plan

Escape grid

Your ability to get out depends on advance warning from smoke alarms and advance planning.

In 2012, there were an estimated 365,000 reported home structure fires and 2,380 associated civilian deaths in the United States.

Fire can spread rapidly through your home, leaving you as little as two minutes to escape safely once the alarm sounds. Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan. 

Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes.  Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors.
   
Safety Tip                                          
 For easy planning, download NFPA's escape planning grid.
                 
 NFPA's escape planning tips and
 
download our free safety tip sheet.

 

FREE ACCESS TO FIRE CODES 


   New York State Codes Division

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MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATIONS 

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The Town of Brighton - Office of the Fire Marshal should not be confused with the primary fire suppression and first response emergency medical operations provided by the Brighton Fire District or the City of Rochester Fire Department within the Town of Brighton.

The Office of the Fire Marshal should not be confused with the 
primary fire suppression and first response emergency medical operations provided by the 
Brighton Fire District or the City of Rochester Fire Department within the Town of Brighton

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